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Monday, 12 March 2007

Warbreck Moor

Warbreck Moor and two more to follow. I loved the skyline, now with knowledge, then because it seemed strange. I loved red brick.


The corner of Wyresdale. To the left Shaws the Chemist, now Bargin Booze (sic) To the right Taylors the Breadshop, now something else. I used to daydream as to who lived under the spire.



This picture of Easbourne Road is way before my time...honest. But it hasn't changed that much. The Wesleyan church has unfortunately been knocked down and replaced by some small town houses - with unadventurous roofs.

I had my first hallucinogenic experience when I was about seven. It was at the dentist’s. I remember his eyes staring down at me, a black rubbery mask-like thing put over my mouth and nose and a stern voice telling me to breathe in deeply. The next thing I remember is being a large, furry bat flying down a long black tunnel that was too small for me. I’m telling you, being a claustrophobic bat is not a nice experience, but having said that, it prepared me for the sixties and seventies. I woke up with a dry throat and a bloody mouth.

The dentist was inappropriately named, Mr Friendly, he smelled of antiseptic, and his drill was the size of a small power tool that could have tackled concrete. The first time he inspected my mouth was when I was about five. I bit his finger and ran out the surgery, past my mum in the waiting room. Within moments I was tearing across a main road, (Warbreck Moor) and was someway down Wyresdale Road before my mother caught me. I was taken back to Mr Friendly and my lessons in dentistry continued.

If I was to freeze-frame just one moment and try to recapture what Warbreck Moor was like in the 1950’s and 60’s, you’d have to imagine me tugging against my mother’s hand and staring back at the road I’d just crossed. The road is still there but the shops and small village atmosphere have now entirely gone.

Directly opposite me was a small patch of grass called Baker’s field where the green No. 2 and No. 30 buses would stop and take us to town. Occasionally a red Ribble bus would pass, coming from such obscure far- away places as Blackpool, Preston, or Ormskirk. Just to the right of the field were four shops. Mangells was a greengrocers shop with wooden floorboards and a perpetually stale and rotten smell. At the back of the shop was large barrel of vinegar with a tap. You bought your own bottles and it was filled up for a penny. There was also a metal bucket in which he kept his beetroot. We never bought his beetroot and this was largely due to my grandmother. She worked in the shop part time and when she needed to go to the toilet, was directed to the metal bucket. Whether there were beetroot in it at the time, or she had to first take them out, she didn’t say.

Next door was a Newsagent, Ruddocks - the centre of much gossip which continued unchanged when it was sold and renamed as Gordons. Next to that was an off-license, and then, on the corner of Wyresdale Road, Shaw’s the chemist.

In an age now of chain store pharmacies, it is hard to recapture the prestige and respect local chemists once enjoyed. His word was law and followed to the letter. Mind you, I’ve never forgiven him for prescribing Friar’s Balsam. It was a foul yellowish liquid that you could rub on your chest, or drink in hot water. It tasted of sugar and sulphur and left a yellowish stain on wherever it landed. It was supposed to cure most things - along the lines of Elias Ashmole’s cure for asthma: swallow a young frog wrapped in muslin. (it’s slime presumably lubricated your throat before being pulled out). Confronted with the frog or Friar’s Balsam, recovery was swift, almost miraculous.

Crossing Wyresdale you had Tailors the baker, Albert the greengrocer and Dave the butcher. The shops were punctuated by a harsh redbrick Methodist church which had a great roof for climbing on…in search of God. Then, on the corner of Eastbourne Road: another newsagent, Robertsons, a fish and chip shop, a haberdashery and finally Moses a small, slightly more expensive bakery. Just to the right of the door as you came in were large sacks of dog biscuits. To a five year old they were just biscuits and I grew to like the taste, until my mother found out and stopped me.
And that’s it, the known world to a five year old who hated the dentist.

61 comments:

Andy Bruce said...

Nice one. Shops I remember; Chemist, corner of wyresdale, had a set of baby wheighing scales in, my sister got weighed in them about 46 yrs ago, then it was an upholsterers, now b. booze.Next to it the 'offy', woman with white hair allways worn up, next Crostons paper shop with dead good looking daughters, next what we called Taylors potato shop, which in time became tommy hinds tyre menders. He had an army geep. Behind those was the repair yard (forgot). Opposite side of wyresdale, Taylors bread shop, daves the butchers,Alberts I used to help him on a friday, Chans the chippy, (chans special with fried egg £2.50) The church, we used to go round the back and have a slash down the cellar steps on the way home from infant school, Warbreck, I could go on, left liverpool 26 yrs ago for work reasons.

Andy Bruce said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Mike Keyton said...

Yes, I remember the daughters! Did you ever climb up to the church roof? We found a gas cylinder there once and tentatively tried blowing gas up our bums. We were children who'd read too many comics. Which street did you live in? We may know some people in common. Thanks for the comment, Andy.

Anonymous said...

Up eastbourne, used to be a chipy, on the left halfway up next to the entry, then it was Ev's sweetshop where you could buy a 'loosie' single cigarete, then it became Deans sweetshop. Just over the other side was Laws shop, my Gran used to get toffee and nutty slack from there. Got some photo's of the Greenwhich House Railwaymans/jockeys accomodation.Allendale.e

Mike Keyton said...

Hi anon, I'm trying to remember those shops, but I'm drawing a blank. Mind, we were creatures of habit and territorial so if I didn't use them I may not remember them. Those photos sound interesting. Thanks for dropping in, Warbreck Moor remains magic to me

Anonymous said...

Hi again, other side of eastbourne on warbreck moor was the sweet shop, I think a wool shop and a bakers shop that a chap called Joe Le Bot I think his name was had a model shop with radio controlled helicopters in and plenty of other unafordable stuff in. Then the old house which was done up 5or6 yrs ago, I always wanted to live there as a kid because it had a garden in the front. I climbed around the back once and there was no space at all. Then the big house that the NSPCC took over. Coming back from warbreck Moor School one day there was a pool of blood outside the gate of the place and some barrier tape. The friendly road sweeper had knocked the sandstone gate post and it fell on him and killed him. Over coerton rd us kids called it the fryingpan because of its shape. I used to run towards albany because me and dad were walking past there once and someone from the house fired an air rifle and the pellet stuck in dads cuff which was on my shoulder at the time, close one. The police came but no one admitted having a gun, it frightened me though as an infant walking past there to school every day. Denholms on the corner where you could look in and see lots of interesting things happening.Used to be sent at dinnertime to pick up bits for dad, IE a crankshaft regrind once. Some times you could find jingles which was all the rage as kids, anyone remember that?

Anonymous said...

Hi Mike, so your from ribblesdale, Ime from allendale, had the privelege of knowing John and his wife as I've said on other pages, I like the work you've put into your sites, its a pity that we all didn't photograph more in those days. Get back to me if you want, I moved away in the early eightys married, kids but still come to allendale and take them up helsby over the cowie like I used to when I was thier age. Andy

Mike Keyton said...

I'm wondering whether you knew Neil Forbes, Alan or Steven Davies, Norman Ellis, and whether you ever climbed over the brick wall to play on plots, or the railway embankment. When we were kids we used to play weird games of Cowboys and Indians wearing gasmasks and old ARRP helmets. And there was a swing on a tree that over looked the cemetary from the railway embankment. Life goes by in a flash :)

Anonymous said...

Hi Mike, Dont instantly remember the names. Yes we were allways in the plots, or over the boards as we used to call it. I can still remember the steam trains. The police train would come now and again so if we heard a train slowing down we'd leg it before they jumped off and chased us.
Yes I remember the rope swing and my mate falling off it. I never got on to the substation roof but we did try as kids and got to the top, our fingers just about holding on to the little bits of brickwork. We were allways told we'd be electricuted if we went near the big iron door or on the roof. Church Avenue/road, used to walk up it around the cinder path at the top there was a friendly chap, lived at the top somewhere behind john and eileens used to park his car in one of those garages propped up on the railway railway enbankment. One night some kids set fire to them and as luck would have it he hadn't put his car away. St peters church was a place I never got to look in. I think the vicar was Mr or Rev Tullock. He used to shop up warbreck moor with his little leather suitcase to put his stuff in. Still can picture walking the dogs up the railway on a sunday morning with a thick head from the Queens and St peters ringing out its single 'death nell' making my head spin. The little collection box in the wall by the bus stop? and the rats in the grass by the hoardings opposite. Under the ferodo bridge was Christies glass shop where you would be sent when you had smashed a window. No one seems to play in the streets now. Opposit side was the barbers with its red and white revolving sign, 1 Shilling and a penny arrow bar back. Alberts place has memories as a kid I used to walk past rubbing my finger through the white adverts he used to paint on his window one day he told his alsation to get me which it didn't it just barked and frightened me to death, (i'd be about 6 ) Dad went around and had words! Later on I used to help him on fridays for a bit stacking potato sacks and listening to his tales. He married the girl from the chippy next door before chan came I think.
The police allways semmed to be around, on a casual call in basis but I allways thought something was going on, the upstairs rooms were full of all sorts of stuff that had nothing to do with vegetables!

Anonymous said...

Some people from riblesdale had an old spaniel called sadie that used to fetch the paper from Crostons on its own

Mike Keyton said...

Anon, this is brilliant stuff and you've reminded me of shops I'd forgotten. I should be drinking a pint reading this. We did climb up the substation and re-enacted the Alamo several times, until a broom stick smashed through a window. Mind, I only went up through peer pressure and not often. Those little sticking out bits of brick were buggers on sweaty fingers. I do remember the dog but nothing else. He's padding around now in my bloody memory, a ghost dog without rhyme or reason. Thanks! :)

Anonymous said...

So many names from the past, i also remember mike barnard, neil forbes, miles and tony hartley, peter and tony lawson, carol and penny charteris, norman ellis, pauline alderton, charlie alty, and linda ruddock, wendy gordon, pat shaw. Was an interesting area to grow up. Do you remember Wrights greengrocers on corner of melling road/warbreck moor, and Brooks grocers next door. Also the Co-op where Lux now is.

Mike Keyton said...

Hi Andy,
If you lived in Allendale, I'm scratching my head why I don't remember you - maybe there's an age difference. Ref all these people, I would love to know what they're all doing now. You mentioned, Pat Shaw - was he the older brother of Billy Shaw, son of the chemist? And do you remember Robert and Paul Charlton? I think Robert joined the police force. Then there was Allan Williams...I think ... lived in the very last street - was that Brackendale?

Warbreck moor was magical

I don't remember those two shops, but I do remember Costigans in the Vale and their shiny red bacon slice with the huge circular blade. I always kept my fingers in my pocket : )

Anonymous said...

Hi Mike, im a different anon from above. Recently came across your site. Pat Shaw was the daughter of family. I seem to remember she was also known as bunty. I remember robert and paul carlton, lived at no.2 ribblesdale, robert did join police force.Their aunt and uncle connie and normal ellis lived in lunesdale, norman was their son. Robert and Paul both married as did norman.Dont know where all the others are now except mike barnard, he married and went to ireland last i heard. Charlie alty,think he was no 5 ribblesdale married Brenda, the eldest Croston daughter. I heard these roads were name after someone called W.R.Lamb (Wyresdale, Ribblesdale, Lunesdale, Allendale, Millersdale and Brackendale). Do you know anything about this? I also have vivid memories of your mum in her red coat on her way shopping, she would always smile say hello and stop for a minute or two. It is so good looking back :)

Mike Keyton said...

Anon, yes, my mum loved her red coats. The image makes me pause.

I knew about Mike Bernard going to Ireland and wonder about him often. Ref Charles Alty, when we were children we thought him and his brother iconic cool - though we wouldn't have used that phrase then : ) But, if you don't mind me asking - do I know you? I think I surely must if you know everyone I knew. Anon is cool to - it's just bugging me : )

Anonymous said...

Other names come to mind Mike - John Cookson, Roger Broughton, Daphne Hillman, Linda and John Wheeler. Ian Jones. Alma Fishwick, Joan Banks. You may have known of me though dont really remember you playing out much, and i was so shy then, so probably forgettable.:) You seem to have done exceptionally well and have made your memories so interesting for the reader.

Mike Keyton said...

Yes, I remember John Cookson, as well as Ian Jones' family on the facing wall whose lives we must have made hell because both walls were used as goal posts for across the road football matches. They were a damn sight more tolerant than I am now : )
I remember Joan Banks too, in Lunedale next door to some garages, and Alma Fishwick. But not Linda and John Wheeler. I don't know about you being shy, but I was similarly handicapped having been hospitalised for 18 months. I think I probably would remember you because I did an awful lot of watching when I ran out of breath
: ) Anyway 'anon' is a privilge as to is curiousity. Thanks for the comments and the memories you've brought back

Lindsey Edwards said...

Hi Mike,

Really interesting post, funny I go past those buildings every day and have never really noticed how beautiful they are above the shops - I found your site because I'm trying to find some information/history about a house on Warbreck Moor - I live in Helsby Road. Here is the google street view link http://goo.gl/maps/9Y5Pi of the one I'm talking about - do you know/remember anything about it or know where I might find something?

Many thanks, take care

Lindsey

Mike Keyton said...

Hi Lindsay. I want to help but the link isn't being found when I google it or paste in the toolbar. Is it accurate?

Mike Keyton said...

PS sorry for the misspell.

Lindsey Edwards said...

Hi Mike, thanks for replying :)
The link works on my computer, how strange - it might be the browser, I use Chrome? The house is the big white one on the right, just before the bridge (going towards the racecourse) - it used to have a car garage at the back, but I don't think that's there anymore.
Thanks again
Lindsey

Mike Keyton said...

Hi Lindsey. When I was a kid the house belonged to a Mr Wright. He had two sons, one of whom might have been David, and drove a large green furniture removal van. There was also a large apple tree from which we used to pinch apples. I was caught once and had my head smacked. It worked. They used to have a large plot of land extending from their house to Greenwich road. But when I was a kid half of it had gone to run down 'plots' on which we used to play. Later, I think, A Mr Dawson bought the house. If google Baffled spirit Ribblesdale, or Baffled Spirit Helsby road you might find more information. I hope this helps. Nice talking to you : )

Lindsey Edwards said...

Hi Mike, thanks so much, that's a great help :) I was hoping to find out why it built originally, if it was anything to do with the railway. Will keep searching and let you know if I find anything. Thanks again, love your blog btw, you are a great writer :) Lindsey

Doug Chadwick said...

....neil forbes, miles and tony hartley, peter and tony lawson, carol and penny charteris, norman ellis, pauline alderton, charlie alty, and linda ruddock, wendy gordon, pat shaw.
.....John Cookson, Roger Broughton, Daphne Hillman, Linda and John Wheeler. Ian Jones. Alma Fishwick, Joan Banks.

I used to live in Millersdale and I remember most of those people. I also remember you Mike. I seem to recall the Alamo on top of the sub-station. Perhaps we were comrades in arms.

I think Miles Hartley's brothers were Kevin and Sean rather than Tony; Also, as far as I remember, it was Charters rather than Charteris and Adlerson rather than Alderton but I could be wrong. I think the Alan Williams you refer to from Brackendale is more likely big Alan Davies (as against little Alan Davies who lived on Wyresdale, next door to Ian Todd).

Mike Keyton said...

Hi Doug, and you're right about 'Kevin'. And dead right about Allan Williams. I should have remembered that. He became a French polisher - a worthy trade in those days, and I later met up with him and his wife in a house near Orrel lane. He gave me a book as present - which I still have.

To my shame - and believe me, I'm mortified because I value memory and I hate causing offence but I can't quite place you, and I'm trying so hard. Do you remember my brother, Tony keyton? I think he was more prominent as a social animal than I was...than I still am : )

Doug Chadwick said...

I’m not surprised that you can’t remember me. We were never bosom-buddy pals, I was just one of the kids in the street. My playmates stretched to lots of friends of friends which gave me a wide ranging, if somewhat shallow set of associates. We only had sustained contact for a relatively short period – around the time of the Alamo, I believe. I do remember Tony but that’s because I remember you as a pair of brothers rather than as individuals.

If it helps put me in place, through most of the 1960’s I had a Saturday and school holiday job delivering milk with Percival’s dairy and could be seen, once a month, blowing a bugle and, later, banging a bass drum, parading with the Scouts from Albany Road to St Peter’s.

Going back to your original blog, was the bakers between Eastbourne and Coerton Roads not called Monk & Howards?

DC

Mike Keyton said...

Doug, thanks for Monks. You're dead right. I remember Percy the milkman - always saw that horse and cart as our own personal Deadwood Stage - though Percy never saw it that way. Thought it weird, too, that there was an actual stables in the middle of terraced housing ie Greenwich avenue just before Kingswood avenue if I remember it right.

Are you still in Liverpool, or have you morphed into a 'plastic scouser' like me : (

Doug Chadwick said...

It was on Greenwich Road, between Albany Road and Moffat Road.

I left Liverpool for Manchester when I got married and then moved to the East coast where I have lived for the last 30 years. I still have family in and around Merseyside but they are out of town so it’s some years since I was last in Liverpool.

Doug

Mike Keyton said...

Ref the stables - I bow to your work-experience
: ) Thanks. Between you, me and anonymous I think we have recreated a fair picture of the Avenues of fifty or so years ago.

Anonymous said...

If anyone one remembers joe lebots model shop that is my dad, hes lives outside of northampton now still messing about with models and fullsize aircraft

Mike Keyton said...

Hi Anon, thanks for dropping in. Rack my brains as I might, I can't remember the shop. I wish I could. I did flirt once with building a mosquito fighter plane from a kit. Confirmed the fact that I was useless : )

Jackie Gregory said...

I REMEMBER NEILL FORBES,ALAN AND STEVEN DAVIES, AND NORMAN ELLIS, AND THE SWING OVER THE RAILWAY ENBANKMENT VERY NEAR THE CEMETARY.ALSO THE GROUP THAT WERE CALLED THE MOHICANS, I THINK ONE WAS CALLED SHOPE.STEVEN AND ALAN DAVIES MOVED TO ELLESMERE PORT AROUND 1965.

Mike Keyton said...

Hi Jackie, so where did you live? I'm just guessing, but did you have a sister, Lorraine?

jackiegregory said...

Hi Mike,
We used to live in Ribblesdale Ave, Yes my sister is Lorraine. Did you and your brother live in the end house or near the end house in Ribblesdale, and did you or your brother play the piano?

Mike Keyton said...

Hey, am I a brilliant guesser or what. Tony played the piano and we lived at the second to end house. You have a brilliant memory, too.

Tony lives in Chorley now, and I live in Monmouth - what you call a 'plastic scouser'. Are you still living in the city? How's life been for you and Lorraine?

jackiegregory said...

Hi Mike,
I live in Maghull now, we did live in Millersdale when first married, then as stated moved to Magull,wanted a garden.
No complaints about life, it beats the alternative.
I believe Lorraine is doing OK .Do you recall Miles, Kevin,and Sean Hartley. I also recall Billy and Patti Shaw(their parents had the chemist on the corner)
How come you settled in Monmouth?

Mike Keyton said...

I remember going to Maghull. There was a bit of marsh and a pond there, near the railway station, I think. We used to hunt frogs (in lieu of lions)

Yes, I remember Miles, Kevin (less so Sean). I believe Miles is living in France. I also remember Billy. He always used to beat me in battles involving toy soldiers.

Ref Monmouth - I went to swansea university - left not knowing what to do other than stay in Swansea. Did a teaching course and ended up, not in Swansea but in Newport where I taught for 30 years. I got off for good behaviour and took early-ish retirement in Monmouth where now I write

jackiegregory said...

Hi Mike,
I looked up your name on google, I always thought it was Keaton and not Keyton,I see your are an author, and a very erudite chap indeed,how would you rate Swansea university, what did you teach ?, did you enjoy teaching?, my eldest daughter taught english and physiology for a couple of years, and left education to join the police force, after a couple of years working in connextions.I am not very often envious, indeed not about material things but I wish I had been more educated, as indeed I ensured my offspring were.
I have a memory that your mum always ensured you did your homework, does my memory serve me well?
I would love to read to read some of your publications, so give me some titles.
I devour all reading materials, and am very into almost anything, poetry, Richard Dawkins,science fiction, the back of cornflake packets.


Mike Keyton said...

Jackie, Swansea University was and is a great university. If you google Baffled spirit Swansea it might give you some idea. I taught History for 30 years before I got off for good behaviour. I think your daughter is wise choosing the police rather than teaching. Ref my publications, Jackie they are, so far, short stories in the fantasy and horror field. I target American publications because they have a vast market. My novels, alas, are still awaiting a publisher. I think some of those anthologies to the left of my page are still available, though my stories there are part of many. I see we share an interest in Science Fiction - less keen on cornflake packets. It's the same bloody plot : )

Anonymous said...

I remember Joe Lebots model shop - I found this because I lost my dad recently and he used to go on all the time about how when I was a little boy he would always take me to Joe Lebots model shop. When CB radios where a big thing (well before ipads!!) I got a CB radio set up from Joe Lebots - give your dad my good wishes and tell him that he went down in our family history!! - still have good memories of going there every Saturday with my dad....Happy times!!

jackiegregory said...

Hi Mike.
saw a person who rememeberd you today name of Norman Elliss,who lived in our younger year facing back windows of Ribblsdale . Do you remememer him.
My brother Roy Winstanley tells me that he has visited this site, can you recall his contact.
Was most amused someone recalled a dentist called Mr Freindly, his title was actually Mr Flenly.or Flenley. I was employed by his succseror Mr Chisholm for several years as a dental surgery assitant.

Mike Keyton said...

Damn it, you're right, Jackie - and thank you. I'll make the correction soon - maybe make a joke about 'Friendly and Chisel'.

Did you enjoy being a dental assistant? Jobs were so easy then compared to today.

And yes, I remember Norman. We had such good neighbours around and about. How's life working out for him.

jackiegregory said...

Hi Mike,
he seemed in good health, I told him about baffled spirit of warbreck moor. as he seemed interested, so maybe he will access sight. Can you believe so many years have gone by and how we have all gone on so many different paths.
I did enjoy being a dental assistant, it took 2 years at muirhead tech to qualify whilst I was working full time as a ward clerk at a maternity hospital,but it was worth it do do what I wanted.Jobs were so easy in the 70ts, nowadays it is always competence tests, by written application, what rubbish this is anyone could fill these in, interviewers seem to lack the ability to judge canditates.

lynne said...

Next to jo lebots was the wool shop then the candlers the second chippy as we called it in wyresdale,this sight brings back many memories and the plots and swing many happy days

Mike Keyton said...

They were good days, Lynne, the plots and that swing on the rail embankment near the cemetery. It was everything you needed to have a good time. Thanks for dropping by

Anonymous said...

Hi Mike, have found a picture of me as a kid in allendale with Percy the milkman but can't upload it!

Mike Keyton said...

I really hope you can find a way. It'd be great to see ihow accurate my memory/mental image of Percy is - and to see if my faulty memory recognises you :)

Anonymous said...

Been happily reading your blog that my sister very kindly came across and sent me, I see from my reading that Jackie and Mike mention the Hartley brothers... Can you tell me a little bit more about them, mainly Myles Hartley, I'd love to hear some stories I believe he was a singer back in the 60s?

Mike Keyton said...

Anon—Sorry. I can't remember much about them. I do remember they had the first black and white TV in the street - twelve inch screen, and we used to peer in through the window to see Rin Tin Tin. Sometimes they let us in. I think the father, Jack was a seaman and his mum was called Edie. I think. Kevin was a cheery tearaway and things may have gone bad for him. I honestly don't know because I'd left the street by the late sixties. Miles had curly hair and was the 'sensible' one - this is the silly way kids think. It'd be nice to get in touch with people again, but it's just such a long time ago. Thanks for dropping by and thanks for the comment

Anonymous said...

Does anyone remember the Hartleys at I think 8 Ribbersdale? I'm pretty certain Myles was in a folk band back in the 60's and was the nice sensible on of the 3 brothers....

Anonymous said...

Thanks Mike for your comments, yes I also believe Kevin was a bit of a tear away, but that Myles was the more sensible of the 3 brothers, Myles was in a folk band do you remember the bands name?

Mike Keyton said...

Anon, I'm sorry, I wish I did know. Children's 'gangs' fragment as they grow older and I was out of Liverpool for most of the time after 1969. I wish I did know what happened to Myles and his folk band. I don't even know if he sang or played an instrument. I know/think he went to music lessons with me and my brother - mandolins can you believe it. And it's ironic because I also joined a 'Folk Band' decades later - Devil's Elbow' - our proudest boast being 'We were big in Abertillery' :)

Kimberley Scott said...

I left in 68, I understand Myles was a director later in life for Lee Cooper in Paris, I'm on the understanding he retired 6years back although I don't where he is now unfortunately. I think he sang and played guitar in the band, it was a Folk Band but don't know the name lol... I shall Google Devils Elbow and check out your stuff.... If the band name springs to mind can you let me know Mike please?

Mike Keyton said...

Hi Kimberley, thanks for the info on Myles. Who knows, he may eventually stumble on this site and catch up on old memories. Did you live in Ribblesdale Avenue? And if Myles ended up in Paris, where did you eventually beach. My family and many of my friends in Aintree ended up all over the place like Dandelion seeds in a gale. Thanks for dropping by

Jonesy said...

I grew up in Wyresdale road, I came across this site by accident, thanks for letting me join

Mike Keyton said...

Hi Jonesy, and thanks for stopping by. You're very welcome but there's nothing really to join. This particular blog post just took off because of people like you googling their youth. Where and when were you in Wyresdale?

Mike Bernard said...

I've got the cash register from Taylor's the grocers. How's that for a souvenir? If you want to see what i'm doing www.mikebernard.ie

Mike Keyton said...

Hi Mike, and it's wonderful to hear from you. How did you find the page?

Mike Bernard said...

I've no idea why but I typed in Warbreck Moor expecting a map so I could take a sentimental journey then I saw a record of a baffled spirit - intriguing thought I, so here I am. It wasn't Ruddocks by the way it was Ruddy's. I know ,cos my mum served there and, by the by, I stepped in and served Charlie Alty with a Rolo ...low and behold he ends up owning it!

Mike Keyton said...

You may be right about Ruddys, but then again, bearing in mind the Liverpool way with words, it may well have been the vernacular for Ruddocks. Not a great debating point I suppose. It was my uncle Dave who told me it was called Ruddocks, and it rang a faint bell. My head is full of faint bells.

jenny said...

Remember joe got bolsor wood of him ,,,I worked in chans they use to get chips there im the fella with the salt